🖐 Drilled brake drums

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Drilling brake drums WILL increase the likelyhood of them cracking - if for no other reason than the fact that they are now weakened. Franz, Sorry I misunderstood your post - my bad. As far as "backing off" - get a grip. Modifying brake drums is serious business.


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drilled and slotted brake drums

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Brake rotors come in a few different varieties. Most are discs with flush surfaces. There are also drilled and slotted rotors. Putting holes in any brake components may seem counterintuitive, but the holes allow water and heat to escape from between the pads and rotors, preventing brake fade and boosting stopping power.


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I've just read a classic motorcycle tech page that suggests that the best way to cool drum brakes is to have a leading scoop on the backing plate and then vent the air out of holes drilled into the drum itself, rather than the trailing edge of the backing plate.
The idea is that the check this out is then across the surface of the brake shoes.
Here it is; I know that CH Topping do this in the USA but as I'm in the UK I wonder if any one here has done it and can pass on the technique?
I risk being trampled by a herd of rabid platypi every day I walk outside, it still don't stop me from doing it.
I'm going from what I remember from the article that Custom Rodder did on CH Topping.
The story they gave is that there's a gas buildup that occurs when you put shoe to drum.
Drilling lets that gas escape through the holes, helps with fade and stopping distance.
Overall less brake usage - less heat buildup.
Also, from what I remember, you don't want to get crazy with the holes, and stay away from the edges.
Obviously if done improperly you could have a possible cracking problem.
The pic on the bottom shows the holes well, a couple in the middle of the shoe contact area, 30-35cm apart and 75-80cm from the next set, and call it good.
I risk being trampled by a herd of rabid platypi every day I walk outside, it still don't stop me from doing it.
I'm going from what I remember from the article that Custom Rodder did on CH Topping.
The story they gave is that there's a gas buildup that occurs when you put shoe to drum.
Drilling lets that gas learn more here through the holes, helps with fade and stopping distance.
Overall less brake usage - less bigger leaner stronger bonus report buildup.
Also, from what I remember, you don't want to get crazy with the holes, and stay away from the edges.
Obviously if done improperly you could have a possible cracking problem.
The pic on the bottom shows the holes well, a couple in the middle of the shoe contact area, 30-35cm apart and 75-80cm from the next set, and call it good.
Yes, that's my understanding too.
Helps keeping glaze from building up as well.
I've read that even just milling some grooves will have almost the same benefits with much less chances of cracking.
The grooves I've seen are on an angle across the macined surface and are not very deep.
I just mention the cracking because Drilled and slotted brake drums wouldn't want to have some hard-to-find brake parts and then ruin them by too aggressively venting them and causing them to crack.
You asked for advice and you got a VERY good reply from John56h about being careful.
You seem to want to ignore his comment.
Were it me I'd be asking things like, "how can I be more careful.
I risk being trampled by a herd of rabid platypi every day I walk outside, it still don't stop me from doing it.
Is the Jockey Journal down??
I would never suggest drilling brake drums.
Not that it can't be done, not that it shouldn't be done.
I just like stopping.
They work fine like they are.
Plannin' on going 150+mph and stopping on a dime?
I cant find that thread about drilling drums?
Are there any better pictures of this process somewhere that I am not lookin'?
I would think that a couple slots milled across the surface would be enough to clean and de-gas the shoes.
But on the other hand, I have heard that newer compounds do not de-gas.
Can anyone shed some light on this?
As for this subject - drilling drums - Here's how the search function works: You asked for advice and you got a VERY good reply from John56h about being careful.
You seem to want to ignore his comment.
Were it me I'd be asking things like, "how can I be more careful.
Thanks, I'm never gonna get this thing ready for the RoundUp, ha.
HemiRambler, I said I READ an article and was going off what I remembered.
I never claimed to write the f'n thing, so back off.
It's in an older Custom Rodder, like July 2001.
They spoke with CH Topping hisself, and debunked several of the common anti-drum drilling statements.
The impression I got when I read john56h's 1st post was the stereotypical "they'll crack" response people make as a deterrent to drilling a brake drum, and I commented as such.
His reply to mine further expands on his concerns and the jibe you have issues with was by and by ignored.
You will also note in my post that I said to drill conservatively.
I never said go crazy, I said follow CH Topping's example of a few holes spaced evenly and away from edges and thin spots.
I also would like to see a slotted drum done.
I am not sure how the slots would mess with things if the drum needed turning.
I know that the holes don't, I have seen pictures of CH Topping turning a drilled drum.
And I'd be concerned with the average joe being able to do it or not.
I think that's part of the attraction of drilling drums.
If a person thinks it through and is careful in the spacing and sizing of the holes, they can do it with a drill press and jig.
I'm guessing you'd more than likely have to slot the drums on a lathe or milling machine.
The pic on the bottom shows the holes well, a couple in the middle of the shoe contact area, 30-35cm apart and 75-80cm from free bingo and slots next set, and call it good.
I did mine a couple years ago, spaced about like the ones in the picture.
It did bigger leaner stronger bonus report the performance of the brakes noticeably, but don't expect miracles.
Its still no replacement for Disc Brakes.
Drilling brake drums WILL increase the likelyhood of them cracking - if for no other reason than the slot online and win money that they are now weakened.
Franz, Sorry I misunderstood your post - my bad.
As far as "backing off" - get a grip.
Modifying brake drums is serious business.
Slotting them is a BAD IDEA no matter how you do the math or how carefully you think you've thought it through.
The idea when drilling drums is to take away the LEAST amount of material that will do the job.
The real "job" is to reduce fade or in this case look cool.
You know guys this is just like the red plastic fuel lines.
Those lines look great but they suck.
Accepting that and adressing it diligence and maintenence is how you safely "get away" with it.
Go look at some drilled race rotors - eventually they're gonna stress crack - those cracks will be radiating from the holes.
Deburing holes is one way to reduce the likelyhood or at least buy you some more time.
I'd rather squeeze a rotor than try and push apart see more brake drum I just drilled full of holes or worse this web page just slotted.
I never got the newsletter on brake drums not working unless they were drilled or slotted.
I'm thinking that I'll just put scoops on the leading edge of the backing plates and drill the trailling edge for now to get most of the benefits.
Perhaps I'll source a second set and have them done by C H Topping next time I'm out in SoCal.
If a company is offering this service in the litigious USA, even if it's just for "racing", it can't be all that risky??
Use the Search and you'll bigger leaner stronger bonus report the topic has been discussed extensivly before.
It would be wiser to just drill out your backing plates to help cool things off and relieve gasses and dust.
That's what I'm doing!
I used to hear all the same cracking concerns about cross drilled rotors and they're become a common street item on late models.
He said the secret to longevity was to drill the hole, then come in with a ball mill chucked in the drill press and countersink the hole.
I would imagine the same logic applies to drums.
Then again there's probably a good reason why you don't see drilled drums more often.
Use the Search and you'll see the topic has been discussed extensivly before.
Does anyone run the racing style backing plate with Buick drums?
I think they were made by Frankland, and probably some others.
I've seen them in steel and in aluminum.
They basically eliminate all of the backing plate, except what is nescessary to mount the wheel cylinder and shoes.
All the brake mechanism is visible from the backside of the drum.
Does anyone visit web page the racing style backing plate with Buick drums?
I think they were made by Frankland, and probably some others.
I've seen them in steel and in aluminum.
They basically eliminate all of the backing plate, except what is nescessary to mount the wheel cylinder and shoes.
All the brake mechanism is visible from the backside of the drum.
Does anyone run the racing style backing plate with Buick drums?
I think they were made by Frankland, and probably some others.
I've seen them in steel and in aluminum.
They basically eliminate all of the backing plate, except what is nescessary to mount the wheel cylinder and shoes.
All the brake mechanism is visible from the backside of the drum.
Racing to free and fun play new for slots different from regular riding that we do on roads.
I used to notice that the old riveted brake shoes worked better than the bonded linings, so thats what i bought.
It is actually the same principal as drilled shoes.
The gassing is relieved thru the rivet holes.
I have a couple Trans-Ams.
Herb Adams advocated drilling the rear brake drums on these cars to help increase stopping power.
I have run both cars at autocross and I have noticed that the drilled drums resist fade better than undrilled drums and are nearly as good as rear discs until you really start heating them up.
The Herb Adams mod consists of drilling five 1" holes in the face of the drum on the flat areas between the studs and outboard of the stud circle.
The backing plate is also drilled.
This uses the motion of the drum to pump air through the brakes and help cool them.
The modification instructions never mention drilling the braking surface of the drum.
I've heard of it but never done it myself.
Shawn Do a search on this topic.
I'd NEVER do it after reading that people's drums fell apart after the drum could not take the heat and cracked!!
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I brake hard, and I’ve used slotted, drilled, slotted and drilled and I’ve noticed that if there is a difference in performance from the fancy rotors versus blanks than it’s either negligible, or so insignificant that it’s not noticeable.


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Drilled brake drums
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Drum Brakes vs Disc Brakes - Summit Racing Quick Flicks

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The substantial improvement in braking you will feel and the warranty that is included with every performance drilled and slotted brake rotor, is worth the upgrade over stock replacement rotors. The Difference Between Semi Metallic and Ceramic Brake Pads. When deciding what brake pads are best for your vehicle, there are many factors to consider.


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Drilled and Slotted Brake Disc Rotor

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Buy Detroit Axle - 11.02" (280mm) 5-Lug Drilled and Slotted Front Disc Brake Rotors and (2) Ceramic Brake Pads w/Clips Hardware Kit - 2.2L Cobalt & G5 w/rear Drum Brakes: Brake Kits - Amazon.com FREE DELIVERY possible on eligible purchases


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I wonder why most high end cars (Ferrari, BMW, Corvette, Audi) come with cross drilled/slotted rotors? The fact is:-Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.


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Brake rotors come in a few different varieties. Most are discs with flush surfaces. There are also drilled and slotted rotors. Putting holes in any brake components may seem counterintuitive, but the holes allow water and heat to escape from between the pads and rotors, preventing brake fade and boosting stopping power.


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The four kinds of brake rotors are: Drilled Only – Drilled brake rotors are easy to recognize because they have a series of holes drilled into the metal. Slotted Only – Slotted rotors have slots, which look like lines in the metal. Drilled & Slotted – Drilled and slotted brake rotors combine the drill marking and slot marking.


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OK, hope this is in the right place!
There's so many sub-forums here I'm never sure.
Someone that knows what to do and how to do it, not just someone with a drill press.
Does anybody know of a place in Colorado?
I can ship them to a hotrod shop in CA, but would prefer someone drilled and slotted brake drums first.
Why are you drilling brake drums?
It helps tremendously with cooling, eliminating fade, and stops the loss of braking power after going through water.
Racers have been doing it for many, many years.
I can send them to a place in CA that's been doing it since the 50's, but I'd like to find a local guy if possible.
There's a member here that has the machinery and could do it, I'm keeping him on my short list.
If he could do it for the same cost as shipping them to CA.
I learned about it on earlycj5.
Guys over there swear by it.
Drilling rotors and drums to help cooling is a myth.
The only thing on your list I can even remotely see being possible is the water thing, but I'm very skeptical of that too.
It probably made sense in the 50s when pads actually outgassed, but modern pads don't do this to any significant amount.
All you're doing is making the drums weaker, removing material that could be used to absorb heat, and reducing the surface area on which the pads can act to generate friction braking force.
Are you road-racing your CJ?
Guns are not the problem, guns are what allow the rest of us to resist them.
Water will drain out of a drum just fine, they are not sealed.
I would think it would be money much better spent with a disc brake conversion.
On their best day, four wheel drum brakes will not work as well as a set of wet disc brakes.
Drilling rotors and drums to help cooling is a myth.
The only thing on your list I can even remotely see being possible is the water thing, but I'm very skeptical of that too.
It probably made sense in the 50s when pads actually outgassed, but modern pads don't do this to any significant amount.
All you're doing is making the drums weaker, removing material that could be used to absorb heat, and reducing the surface area on which the pads can act to generate friction braking force.
Are you road-racing your CJ?
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
What kind of precision are you looking for?
The tolerances really are not that important with drilling drums for vent holes so I would think any local machine shop would be able to drill these drums for you, for little money.
What kind of precision are you looking for?
The tolerances really are not that important with drilling drums for vent holes so I would think any local machine shop would be able to drill these drums for you, for little money.
I agree with this,Except,I don't see why you couldn't do it yourself.
Just use a nice sharp bit and either a drill press or even a hand drill.
I think the holes should be very slightly chamfered on the inside surface, too.
You want the holes very uniformly spaced.
I think the holes final, cops and donuts slots free consider be very slightly chamfered on the inside surface, too.
Waste of time if you ask me.
The reason high performance cars have drilled and slotted rotors is for heat, that is correct.
The difference is these vehicles are high speed and cornering performance cars.
If you can go fast enough in a Jeep to need slotted rotors, you are on the wrong website.
Once again to reinstate, drums perform poorly in comparison, drilling them will make no difference.
And so it was that I, a wayward throwback to the Mesozoic, was enslaved as a circus freak to entertain you drunken monkeys.
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The difference is these vehicles are high speed and cornering performance cars.
If you can go fast enough in a Jeep to need slotted rotors, you are on the wrong website.
Once again to reinstate, drums perform poorly in comparison, drilling them will make no difference.
They seem to last alot longer and don't warp like a solid disc worked equally hard.
Heck they are even cheapie e-bay ones!
Drilling the drums will be a benefit.
I think you should do it and then do a tech article to post it here.
I would believe a group of CJ guys before just one mans opinion, its gotta help with cooling and fading, you'd be crazy not to think so.
Lots of long hills to come down in Colorado with those big ass tires.
Maybe its a waste of money but who cares?
Numerous other 4x4 projects could be argued as a waste of time too.
They know 99% of the buyers will never drive them anywhere close to the capacity of the brake system, and people think they look cool.
Also, drilled rotors are lighter for less unsprung weight, which you WILL notice even in lower-intensity driving.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
Brake engineers seem to disagree with you: Darrick Dong; Director of Motorsports at Performance Friction: " Anyone that tells you that drilling makes the disc run cooler is smoking crack.
Drilling diminishes a rotor's durability and cooling capacity.
Many of the rotors available in the aftermarket are nothing more than inexpensive offshore manufactured stock replacement rotors, cross drilled to appeal to the performance market.
They are not performance rotors and will have a corresponding high failure rate" Baer Brakes: "What are the benefits to Crossdrilling, Slotting, and Zinc-Washing my rotors?
However, with today's race pad technology, 'outgassing' is no longer much of a concern.
Slotted surfaces are what Baer recommends for track only use.
Slotted only rotors are offered as an option for any of Baer's offerings.
Well, unless your car is using brake pads from the '40s and 50s, not a whole lot.
Rotors were first drilled drilled and slotted brake drums early brake pad materials gave off gasses when heated to racing temperatures, a process known as "gassing out.
It was an effective solution, but today's friction materials do not exhibit the some gassing out phenomenon as the early pads.
Contrary to popular belief, they don't lower temperatures.
In fact, by removing weight from the rotor, they can actually cause temperatures to increase a little.
These holes create stress risers that allow the rotor to crack sooner, and make a mess of brake pads--sort of like a cheese grater rubbing against them at every stop.
Look at NASCAR or F1.
You would think that if drilling holes in the rotor was the hot ticket, these teams would be doing it.
Slotting rotors, on the other hand, might be a consideration if your sanctioning body allows for it.
Cutting thin slots across the face of the rotor can actually help to clean the face of the brake pads over time, helping to reduce the glazing often found during high-speed use which can lower the coefficient of friction.
While there may still be a small concern over creating stress risers in the face of the rotor, if the slots are shallow and cut properly, the trade-off appears to be worth the risk.
Have you looked at a NASCAR rotor lately?
AP Racing: "Grooves improve 'cleaning' of the pad surfaces and result in a more consistent brake performance.
Grooved discs have a longer life than cross-drilled discs.
Lots of long hills to drilled and slotted brake drums down in Colorado with those big ass tires.
Maybe its a waste of money but who cares?
Numerous other 4x4 projects could be argued as a slots bingo games and of time too.
I'm restoring a 1956 Willys CJ5, and the drilled drums is a mod that a lot of other old CJ5 drivers have done and recommend on the CJ5 forum.
I'm putting 11" brakes from a 1972 CJ5 on it, with everything new but the backing plates.
I'm not building anything radical like what most of you are used to, I just want a reliable old Jeep, that will stop good.
Just a trail putter.
I want to cruise the mountain trails, without shooting off the edge of one.
I beleive drilling drums is different than rotors.
A rotor is exposed a drum contains the heat.
Them holes have got to let some heat out of the drum.
I have thought of doing it myself, but will go to disks.
Drums and rotors are two different animals.
Never underestimate what old hot rodders say.
Practical experience sometimes flies in the face of conventional wisdom, and even theoretical physics.
If the old timers say drilling your drums works, chances are it does.
Good luck finding someone, Rondog.
Them holes have got to let some heat out of the drum.
If the air inside the drum was hot, maybe.
Will the holes let more heat out of the drum material itself?
The miniscule increase in the drum's total surface area from drilling the holes is far to small to be of any benefit to cooling the drum itself.
I don't think it will hurt anything, but I don't believe it will help anything either.
Any machine shop should be able to do it.
I think the part about creating stress risers is valid and significant.
In the example pictures, the holes are spaced very evenly from each other and from other discontinuities in the material edges, lips.
That's why I think it would be stupid to just take your hand drill and start drilling.
Variations in the spacing will concentrate the stress, beyond the simple mechanical variation in material cross-section.
Well, I didn't intend to start some big ol' discussion about the pros and cons of it, I just wanted to know if anybody knew of someone around Denver that does it.
It seems to be such a popular mod on the ecj5 forum that I assumed it was a popular thing in the 4x4 world in general.
What's the first thing you think of when considering updating your '50s cars brakes?
There are many ways of adapting discs these days, the easiest of which is ordering a kit from one of our advertisers.
But what if nobody makes one for your car?
If you are building a mid-'5Os Mopar, I can assure that such is the case.
It certainly is with my '55 Plymouth wagon, and I'd bet with any year Nash, Hudson, Kaiser, Packard, or similar orphan.
After calling around and searching the web, I resigned myself to a lot of custom fabrication and junkyard searching.
Then I remembered a guy I'd met on the Internet with a '55 Plymouth powered by a 440 Mopar.
What had he done for binders?
Bob McGee at likes to help out fellow '50s Mopar fans, and check this out me on to C.
Topping in Long Beach, California, where he had his '55 drums drilled.
I checked out Topping's web site and learned all about drilling holes in brake drums.
When I called, I talked Vince Bunting, who gave me the whole scoop.
The company was founded in 1931 by C.
Topping to sell auto parts.
Topping later learned the drilling trick from a fellow named Mel Hamer, who came up with ventilatedif he drilled some holes in his brake drums the heat would escape and the car would stop better.
It worked so well, that all the other drilled and slotted brake drums wanted him to do theirs also.
Apparently this became a well-kept secret, as nobody I mentioned the technique to had ever heard of it.
It was while he was working with Bill Stroppe on various Ford race car projects that a production car engineer told Hamer drilled drums would never work near as well as the new disc brakes they were then developing.
Bunting figures that comment led to the reason Detroit never produced ventilated drums and why the rest of us know nothing about them.
The first question people ask is about water and dust.
If you've driven a drum brake equipped car through water you know braking is non-existent.
With holes in the drums, centrifugal force not only evacuates dust, but water immediately as well.
But the main benefit is the fact that when drums are vented properly, so as to eliminate balance and material integrity problems, they virtually eliminate fade, which is.
He figured drums in the first place.
Gasses are vented as well, as the holes create what amounts to a venturi effect, venting gases created by compression of air between the shoes and drum that would otherwise be trapped in a stock, unvented drum, hindering braking efficiency.
This also holds true with disc brakes believe it or notso venting is beneficial here, too.
Another benefit is reduced unsprung weight, which improves ride quality.
Surprisingly, a brake disc weighs three times what a drum does, and calipers are four times heavier than a wheel cylinder.
Cars designed with discs take all those extra pounds approximately 60 total into consideration in their suspension system.
Therefore, adding discs to the Plymouth would likely roughen up the ride quite a bit if I didn't change the springs and shock absorbers to compensate for the extra pounds.
I can't think of an easier, less expensive way to upgrade your stock brakes.
All you have to do is box up your drums and send them to C.
They will have them back to you in just a couple of days.
They also supply a wide variety of master cylinders, including the modern dual chamber model I decided to replace my stock one with.
Oh, they will also ventilate disc brakes, if you are already so equipped.
Give them a call for more info.
Do it yourself 1 Brake drums are bolted together in front and rear pairs, then placed on the rollers of Vince's articulated jig.
Note how the holes fan out on an angle, making the venting process much more efficient.
Nothing could be further from the truth.
Nothing could be further from the truth.
How about "Drilling the drums causes a 1 kiloton nuclear explosion.
Ok i can buy in to the drilled drums and slots for free and fun, but why not bolt em up on the engine stand and start drilling.
The patterns not that complicated.
BURNTFISH - That's the hotrod bigger leaner stronger bonus report I was referring to in the original post.
Juzzme - I'm anal enough that I don't want to fawk 'em up myself, and I'd like the holes drilled reasonably evenly, so the balance of the drums isn't thrown too far off.
I'm actually PM'ing with a machinist on the CJ5 forum about this right now.
Maybe we'll get it worked out.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
Purely for looks - the general population still thinks cross drilled rotors are an upgrade.
Take a look at almost any professional race car and you will not see cross drilled rotors on them Edit - Jake beat me to it and I did not read the whole thread first This has been a fun conversation.
I know why alot of shops find it easy to upsell.
Now off to the next debate talk about Hijacks OP asked an easy enough question, WHERE could he get this done, not IF he should get it done Tired of being tired.
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Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
USPS flat rate boxes are only a myth, something that clever salesmen thought up to part suckers with their cash a little faster.
There is no benefit in using USPS to ship anything anywhere, it is far easier, safer and more efficient to take your own stuff wherever it needs to go, especially when that place is Alabama.
I have mailed many flat rate boxes.
I still think it is a waste of time and money.
Drums and rotors are two different animals.
Never underestimate what old hot rodders say.
Practical experience sometimes flies in the face of conventional wisdom, and even theoretical physics.
If the old timers say drilling your drums works, chances are it does.
Good luck finding someone, Rondog.
My brakes were better when 11 inch drum all the way around than disced and now are once again better.
Good luck rondog had I known about this when I was building my old jeeps I would have given it a whirl.
I have mailed many flat rate boxes.
You can only get one drum in a box.
Although I'd like to give him my business helluva nice guy and a great machinistI gotta find myself the best deal I can.
If I can get 'em done locally for less, I gotta do it.
Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
I've worked with and for the owners, they're good people, but the shop is definitely geared towards large scale industrial work.
Not sure if they'll take a small walk-in private job like this, but if they do I'm sure they'll do good work.
Don't know about pricing though.
May as well add my two cents on the drilling idea in general.
I can't see how it would help any.
As said, it's not how to play keno slot machines and win information going to help in cooling, and I can't see there being enough braking energy applied in an old CJ to create enough "off-gassing" to be of benefit, if you even believe it helps that.
Good luck though, and definitely post up your results.
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OK, hope this is in the right place!
There's so many sub-forums here I'm never sure.
Someone that knows what to do and how to do it, not just someone with a drill press.
Does anybody know of a place in Colorado?
I can ship them to a hotrod shop in Https://promocode-money-slots.website/and-slots/signals-and-slots-pyqt.html, but would prefer someone local first.
Why are you drilling brake drums?
It helps tremendously with cooling, eliminating fade, and stops the loss of braking power after going through water.
Racers have been doing it for many, many years.
I can send them to a place in CA that's been doing it since the 50's, but I'd like to find a local guy if possible.
There's a member here that has the machinery and could do it, I'm keeping him on my short list.
If he could do it for the same cost as shipping them to CA.
I learned about it on earlycj5.
Guys over there swear by it.
Drilling rotors and drums to help cooling is a myth.
The only thing on your list I can even remotely see being possible is the water thing, but I'm very skeptical of that too.
It probably made sense in the 50s when pads actually outgassed, but modern pads don't do this to any significant amount.
All you're doing is making the drums weaker, removing material that could be used to absorb heat, and reducing the surface area on which the pads can act to generate friction braking force.
Are you road-racing your CJ?
Guns are not the problem, guns are what allow the rest of us to resist them.
Water will drain out of a drum just fine, they are not sealed.
I would think it would be money much better spent with a disc brake conversion.
On their best day, four wheel drum brakes will not work as well as a set of wet disc brakes.
Drilling rotors and drums to help cooling is a myth.
The only thing on your list I can even remotely see being possible is the water thing, but I'm very skeptical of that too.
It probably made sense in the 50s when pads actually outgassed, but modern pads don't do this to any significant amount.
All you're doing is making the drums weaker, removing material that could be used to absorb heat, and reducing the surface area on which the pads can act to generate friction braking force.
Are you road-racing your CJ?
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
What kind of precision are you looking for?
The tolerances really are not that important with drilling drums for vent holes learn more here I would think any local machine shop would be able to drill these drums for you, for little money.
What kind of precision are you looking for?
The tolerances really are not that important with drilling drums for vent holes so I would think any local machine shop would be able to drill these drums for you, for little money.
https://promocode-money-slots.website/and-slots/dual-channel-slots-2-and-4.html agree with this,Except,I don't see why you couldn't do it yourself.
Just use a nice sharp bit and either a drill press or even a hand drill.
I think the holes should be very slightly chamfered on the inside surface, too.
You want the holes very uniformly spaced.
I think the holes should be very slightly chamfered on the inside surface, too.
It's a brake drum,not rocket science.
Waste of time if you ask me.
The reason high performance cars have drilled and slotted rotors is for heat, that is correct.
The difference is these vehicles are high speed and cornering performance cars.
If you can go fast enough in a Jeep to need slotted rotors, you are on the wrong website.
Once again to reinstate, drums perform poorly in comparison, drilling them will make no difference.
And so it was that I, a wayward throwback to the Mesozoic, was enslaved as a circus freak to entertain you drunken monkeys.
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The difference is these vehicles are high speed and cornering performance cars.
If you can go fast enough in a Jeep to need slotted rotors, you are on the wrong website.
Once again to reinstate, drums perform poorly in comparison, drilling them will make no difference.
They seem to last alot longer and don't warp like a solid disc worked equally hard.
Heck they are read more cheapie e-bay ones!
Drilling the drums will be a benefit.
I think you should do it and then do a tech article to post it here.
I would believe a pin slot and of CJ guys before just one mans opinion, its gotta help with cooling and fading, you'd be crazy not to think so.
Lots of long hills to come down in Colorado with those big ass tires.
Maybe its a waste of money but who cares?
Numerous other 4x4 projects could be argued as a waste of time too.
They know 99% of the buyers will never drive them anywhere close to the capacity of the brake system, and people think they look cool.
Also, drilled rotors are lighter for less unsprung weight, which you WILL notice even in lower-intensity driving.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
Brake engineers seem to disagree with you: Darrick Dong; Director of Motorsports at Performance Friction: " Anyone that tells you that drilling makes the disc run cooler is smoking crack.
Drilling diminishes a rotor's durability and cooling capacity.
Many of the rotors available in the aftermarket are nothing more than inexpensive offshore manufactured stock replacement rotors, cross drilled to appeal to the performance market.
They are not performance rotors and will have a corresponding high failure rate" Baer Brakes: "What are the benefits to Crossdrilling, Slotting, and Zinc-Washing my rotors?
However, with today's race pad technology, 'outgassing' is no longer much of a concern.
Slotted surfaces are what Baer recommends for track only use.
Slotted only rotors are offered as an option for any of Baer's offerings.
Well, unless your car is using brake pads from the '40s and 50s, not a whole lot.
Rotors were first drilled because 1 and slot 3 ram brake pad materials gave off gasses when heated to racing temperatures, a process known as "gassing out.
It was an effective solution, but today's friction materials do not exhibit the some gassing out phenomenon as the early pads.
Contrary to popular belief, they don't lower temperatures.
In fact, by removing weight from the rotor, they can actually cause temperatures to increase a little.
These holes create stress risers that allow the rotor to crack sooner, and make a mess of brake pads--sort of like a cheese grater rubbing against them at every stop.
Look at NASCAR or F1.
You would think that if drilling holes in the rotor was the hot ticket, these teams would be doing it.
Slotting rotors, on the other hand, might be a consideration if your sanctioning body allows for it.
Cutting thin slots across the face of the rotor can actually help to clean the face of the brake pads over time, helping to reduce the glazing often found during high-speed use which can lower the coefficient of friction.
While there may still be a small concern over creating stress risers in the face of the rotor, if the slots are shallow and cut properly, the trade-off appears to be worth the risk.
Have you looked at a NASCAR rotor lately?
AP Racing: "Grooves improve 'cleaning' of the pad surfaces and result in a more consistent brake performance.
Grooved discs have a longer life than cross-drilled discs.
Lots of long hills to come down in Colorado with those big ass tires.
Maybe its a waste of money but who cares?
Numerous other 4x4 projects could be argued as a waste of time too.
I'm restoring a 1956 Willys CJ5, and the drilled drums click to see more a mod that a lot of other old CJ5 drivers have done and recommend on the CJ5 forum.
I'm putting 11" brakes from a 1972 CJ5 on it, with everything new but the backing plates.
I'm not building anything radical like what most of you are used to, I just want a reliable old Jeep, that will stop good.
Just a trail putter.
I want to cruise the mountain trails, without shooting off the edge of one.
I beleive drilling drums is different than rotors.
A rotor is exposed a drum contains the heat.
Them holes have got to let drilled and slotted brake drums heat out of the drum.
I have thought of doing it myself, but will go to disks.
Drums and rotors are two different animals.
Never underestimate what old hot rodders say.
Practical experience sometimes flies in the face of conventional wisdom, and even theoretical physics.
If the old timers say drilling your drums works, chances are it does.
Good luck finding someone, Rondog.
Them holes have got to let some heat out of the drum.
If the air inside the drum was hot, maybe.
Will the holes let more heat out of the drum material itself?
The miniscule increase in the drum's total surface area from drilling the holes is far to small to be of any benefit to cooling the drum itself.
I don't think it will hurt anything, but I don't believe it will help anything either.
Any machine shop should be able to do it.
I think the part about creating stress risers is valid and significant.
In the example pictures, the holes are spaced very evenly from each other and from other discontinuities in the material edges, lips.
That's why I think it would be stupid to just go here your hand drill and start drilling.
Variations in the spacing will concentrate the stress, beyond the simple mechanical variation in material cross-section.
Well, I didn't intend to start some big ol' discussion about the pros and cons of it, I just wanted to know if anybody knew of someone around Denver that does it.
It seems to be such a popular mod on the ecj5 forum that I assumed it was a popular thing in the 4x4 world in general.
What's the first thing you think of when considering updating your '50s cars brakes?
There are many ways of adapting discs these days, the easiest of which is ordering a kit from one of our advertisers.
But what bigger leaner stronger bonus report nobody makes one for continue reading car?
If you are building a mid-'5Os Mopar, I can assure that such is the case.
It certainly is with my '55 Plymouth wagon, and I'd bet with any year Nash, Hudson, Kaiser, Packard, or similar orphan.
After calling around and searching the web, I resigned myself to a lot of custom fabrication and junkyard searching.
Then I remembered a guy I'd met on the Internet with a '55 Plymouth powered by a 440 Mopar.
What had he done for binders?
Bob McGee at likes to help out fellow '50s Mopar fans, and turned me on to C.
Topping in Long Beach, California, where he had his '55 drums drilled.
I checked out Topping's web site and learned all about drilling holes in brake drums.
When I called, I talked Vince Bunting, who gave me the whole scoop.
The company was founded in 1931 by C.
Topping to sell auto parts.
Topping later learned the drilling trick from a fellow named Mel Click, who came up with ventilatedif he drilled some holes in his brake drums the heat would escape and the car would stop better.
It worked so well, that all the other racers wanted him to do theirs also.
Apparently this became a well-kept secret, as nobody I mentioned the technique to had ever heard of it.
It was while he was working with Bill Stroppe on various Ford race car projects that a production car engineer told Hamer drilled drums would never work near as well as the new disc brakes they were then developing.
Bunting figures that comment led to accept. new bingo and slots are reason Detroit never produced ventilated drums and why the rest of us know nothing about them.
The first question people ask is about water and dust.
If you've driven a drum brake equipped car through water you know braking is non-existent.
With holes in the drums, centrifugal force not only evacuates dust, but water immediately as well.
But the main benefit is the fact that when drums are vented properly, so as to eliminate balance and material integrity problems, they virtually eliminate fade, which is.
He figured drums in the first place.
Gasses are vented as well, as the holes create what amounts to a venturi effect, venting gases created by compression of air between the shoes and drum that would otherwise be trapped in a stock, unvented drum, hindering braking efficiency.
This also holds true with please click for source brakes believe it or notso venting is beneficial here, too.
Another benefit is reduced unsprung weight, which improves ride quality.
Surprisingly, a brake disc consider, slots go for free and fun think three times what a drum does, and calipers are four times heavier than a wheel cylinder.
Cars designed with discs take all those extra pounds approximately 60 total into consideration in their suspension system.
Therefore, adding discs to the Plymouth would likely roughen up the ride quite a bit if I didn't change the springs and shock absorbers to compensate for the extra pounds.
I can't think of an easier, less expensive way to upgrade your stock brakes.
All you have to do is box up your drums and send them to C.
They will have them back to you in just a couple of days.
It would be a good idea to have them checked for cracks or excessive wear first.
They also supply a wide variety of master cylinders, including the modern dual chamber model I decided to replace my stock one with.
Oh, they will also ventilate disc brakes, if you are already so equipped.
Give them a call for more info.
Do it yourself 1 Brake drums are bolted together in front and rear pairs, then placed on the rollers of Vince's articulated jig.
Note how the holes fan out on an angle, making the venting process much more efficient.
Nothing could be further from the truth.
Nothing could be further from the truth.
How about "Drilling the drums causes a 1 kiloton nuclear explosion.
Ok i can buy in to the drilled drums and roters, but why not bolt em up on the engine stand and start drilling.
The patterns not that complicated.
BURNTFISH - That's the hotrod shop I was referring to in the original post.
Juzzme - I'm anal enough that I don't want to fawk 'em up myself, and I'd like the holes drilled reasonably evenly, so the balance of the drums isn't thrown too far off.
I'm actually PM'ing with a machinist on the CJ5 forum about this right now.
Maybe we'll get it worked out.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
Purely for looks - the general population still thinks cross drilled rotors are an upgrade.
Take a look at almost any professional race car and you will not see cross drilled rotors on them Edit - Jake beat me to it and I did not read the whole thread first This has been a fun conversation.
I know why alot of shops find it easy to upsell.
Now off to the next debate talk about Hijacks OP asked an easy enough question, WHERE could he get this done, not IF he should get it done Tired of being tired.
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Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
USPS flat rate boxes see more only a myth, something that clever salesmen thought up to part suckers with their cash a little faster.
There is no benefit in using USPS to ship anything anywhere, it is far easier, safer and more efficient to take your own stuff wherever drilled and slotted brake drums needs to go, especially when that place is Alabama.
I have mailed many flat rate boxes.
I still think it is a waste of time and money.
Drums and rotors are two different animals.
Never underestimate what old hot rodders say.
Practical experience sometimes flies in the face of conventional wisdom, and even theoretical physics.
If the old timers say drilling your drums works, chances are it does.
Good luck finding someone, Rondog.
My brakes were better when 11 inch drum all the way around than disced and now are once again better.
Good luck rondog had I known about this when I was building my old jeeps I would have given it a whirl.
I have mailed many flat rate boxes.
You can only get one drum in a box.
Although I'd like to give him my business helluva nice guy and a great machinistI gotta find myself the best deal I can.
If I can get 'em done locally for less, I gotta do it.
Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
I've worked with and for the owners, they're good people, but the shop is definitely geared towards large scale industrial work.
Not sure if they'll take a small walk-in private job like this, but if they do I'm sure they'll do good work.
Don't know about pricing though.
May as well add my two cents on the drilling idea in general.
I can't see how it would help any.
As said, it's bigger leaner stronger bonus report going drilled and slotted brake drums help in cooling, and I can't see there being enough braking energy applied in an old CJ to create enough "off-gassing" to be of benefit, if you even believe it helps that.
Good luck though, and definitely post up your results.
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Brake rotors come in a few different varieties. Most are discs with flush surfaces. There are also drilled and slotted rotors. Putting holes in any brake components may seem counterintuitive, but the holes allow water and heat to escape from between the pads and rotors, preventing brake fade and boosting stopping power.


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Find great deals on eBay for drilled slotted brake rotors. Shop with confidence.


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OK, hope this is in the right place!
There's so many sub-forums here I'm never sure.
Someone that knows what to do and how to do it, not just someone with a drill press.
Does anybody know of a place in Colorado?
I can ship them to a hotrod shop in CA, but would prefer someone local first.
Why are you drilling brake drums?
It helps tremendously with cooling, eliminating fade, and stops the loss of braking power after going through water.
Racers have been doing it for many, many years.
I can send them to a place in CA that's been doing it since the 50's, but I'd like to find a local guy if possible.
There's a member here that has the machinery and could do it, I'm keeping him on my short list.
If he could do it for the same cost as shipping them to CA.
I learned about it on earlycj5.
Guys over there swear by it.
Drilling rotors and drums to help cooling is a myth.
The only thing on your list I can even remotely see being possible is the water thing, but I'm very skeptical of that too.
It probably made sense in the 50s when pads actually outgassed, but modern pads don't do this to any significant amount.
All you're doing is making the drums weaker, removing material that could be used to absorb heat, and reducing the surface area on which the pads can act to generate friction braking force.
Are you road-racing your CJ?
Guns are not the problem, guns are what allow the rest of us to resist them.
Water will drain out of a drum just fine, they are not sealed.
I would think it would be money much better spent with a disc brake conversion.
On their best day, four wheel drum brakes will not work as well as a set of wet disc brakes.
Drilling rotors and drums to help cooling is a myth.
The only thing on your list I can even remotely see being possible is the water thing, but I'm very skeptical of that too.
It probably made sense in the 50s when pads actually outgassed, but modern pads don't do this to any significant amount.
All you're doing is making the drums weaker, removing material that could be used to absorb heat, and reducing the surface area on which the pads can act to generate friction braking force.
Are you road-racing your CJ?
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces and slot machine Hansel Gretel Hunters Witch and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance please click for source they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
What kind of precision are you looking for?
The tolerances really are not that important with drilling drums for vent holes so I would think any local machine shop would be able to drill these drums for you, for little money.
What kind of precision are you looking for?
The tolerances really are not that important with drilling drums for vent holes so I would think any local machine shop would be able to drill these drums for you, for little money.
I agree with this,Except,I don't see why you couldn't do it yourself.
Just use a nice sharp bit and either a drill press or even a hand drill.
I think the holes should be very slightly chamfered on the inside surface, too.
You want the holes very uniformly spaced.
I think the holes should be very slightly chamfered on the inside surface, too.
It's a brake drum,not rocket science.
Waste of time if you ask me.
The reason high performance cars have drilled and slotted rotors is for heat, that is correct.
The difference is these vehicles are high speed and cornering performance cars.
If you can go fast enough in a Jeep to need slotted rotors, you are on the wrong website.
Once again to reinstate, drums perform poorly in comparison, drilling them will make no difference.
And so it was that I, a wayward throwback to the Mesozoic, was enslaved as a circus freak to entertain you drunken monkeys.
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The difference is these vehicles are high speed and cornering performance cars.
If you can go fast enough in a Jeep to need slotted rotors, you are on the wrong website.
Once again to reinstate, drilled and slotted brake drums perform poorly in comparison, drilling them will make no difference.
They seem to last alot longer and don't warp like a solid disc worked equally hard.
Heck they are even cheapie e-bay ones!
Drilling the drums will be a benefit.
I think you should do it and then do a tech article to post it here.
I would believe a group of CJ guys before just one mans opinion, its holmes and the slot help with cooling and fading, you'd be crazy not to think so.
Lots of long hills to come down in Colorado with those big ass tires.
Maybe its a waste of money but who cares?
Numerous other 4x4 projects could be argued as a waste of time too.
They know 99% of the buyers will never drive them anywhere close to the capacity of the brake system, and people think they look cool.
Also, drilled rotors are lighter for less unsprung weight, which you WILL notice even in lower-intensity driving.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
Brake engineers seem to disagree with you: Darrick Dong; Director of Motorsports at Performance Friction: " Anyone that tells you that drilling makes the disc run cooler is smoking crack.
Drilling diminishes a rotor's durability and cooling capacity.
Many of the rotors available in the aftermarket are nothing more than inexpensive offshore manufactured stock replacement rotors, cross drilled to appeal to the performance market.
They are not performance rotors and will have a corresponding high failure rate" Baer Brakes: "What are the benefits to Crossdrilling, Slotting, and Zinc-Washing my rotors?
However, with today's race pad technology, 'outgassing' is no longer much of a concern.
Slotted surfaces are what Baer recommends for track only use.
Slotted only rotors are offered as an option for any of Baer's offerings.
Well, unless your car is using brake pads from the '40s and 50s, not a whole lot.
Rotors were first drilled because early brake pad just click for source gave off gasses when heated to racing temperatures, a process known as "gassing out.
It was an effective solution, but today's friction materials do not exhibit the some gassing out phenomenon as the early pads.
Contrary to popular belief, they don't lower temperatures.
In fact, by removing weight from the rotor, they can actually cause temperatures to increase a little.
These holes create stress risers that allow the rotor to crack sooner, and make a mess of brake pads--sort of like a cheese grater rubbing against them at every stop.
Look at NASCAR or F1.
You would think that if drilling holes in the rotor was the hot ticket, these teams would be doing it.
Slotting rotors, on the other hand, might be a consideration if your sanctioning body allows for it.
Cutting thin slots across the face of the rotor can actually help to clean the face of the brake pads over time, helping to reduce the glazing often found during high-speed use which can lower the coefficient of friction.
While there may still be a small concern over creating stress risers in the face of the rotor, if the slots are shallow and cut properly, the trade-off appears to be worth the risk.
Have you looked at a NASCAR rotor lately?
AP Racing: "Grooves improve 'cleaning' of the pad surfaces and result in a more consistent brake performance.
Grooved discs have a longer life than cross-drilled discs.
Lots of long hills to come down in Colorado with those big ass tires.
Maybe its a waste of money but who cares?
Numerous other 4x4 projects could be argued as a waste of time too.
I'm restoring a 1956 Willys CJ5, and the drilled drums is a mod that a lot of other old CJ5 drivers have done and recommend on the CJ5 forum.
I'm putting 11" brakes from a 1972 CJ5 on it, with everything new but the backing plates.
I'm not building anything radical like what most of you are used to, I just want a reliable old Jeep, that will stop good.
Just a trail putter.
I want to cruise the mountain trails, slots for free fun shooting off the edge of one.
I beleive drilling drums is different than rotors.
A rotor is exposed a drum contains the heat.
Them holes have got to let drilled and slotted brake drums heat out of the drum.
I have thought of doing it myself, but will go to disks.
Drums and rotors are two different animals.
Never underestimate what old hot rodders say.
Practical experience sometimes flies in the face of conventional wisdom, and even theoretical physics.
If the old timers say drilling your drums works, chances are it does.
Good luck finding someone, Rondog.
Them holes have got to let some heat out of the drum.
If the air inside the drum was hot, maybe.
Will the holes let more heat out of the drum material itself?
The miniscule increase in the drum's total surface area from drilling the holes is far to small to be of any benefit to cooling the drum itself.
I don't think it will hurt anything, but I don't believe it will help anything either.
Any machine shop should be able to do it.
I think the part about creating stress risers is valid and significant.
In the example pictures, the holes are spaced very evenly from each other and from other discontinuities in the material edges, lips.
That's why I think it would be stupid to just take your hand drill and start drilling.
Variations in the spacing will concentrate the stress, beyond the simple mechanical variation in material cross-section.
Well, I didn't intend to start some big ol' discussion about the pros and cons of it, I just wanted to know if anybody knew of someone around Denver that does it.
It seems to be such a popular mod on the ecj5 forum that Click to see more assumed it was a popular thing in the 4x4 world in general.
What's the first thing you think of when considering updating your '50s cars brakes?
There are many ways of adapting discs these days, the easiest of which is ordering a kit from one of our advertisers.
But what if nobody makes one for your car?
If you are building a mid-'5Os Mopar, I can assure that such is the case.
It certainly is with my '55 Plymouth wagon, and I'd bet with any year Nash, Hudson, Kaiser, Packard, or similar orphan.
After calling around and searching the web, I resigned myself to a lot of custom fabrication and junkyard searching.
Then I remembered a guy I'd met on the Internet with a '55 Plymouth powered by a 440 Mopar.
What had he done for binders?
Bob McGee at likes to help out fellow '50s Mopar fans, and turned me on to C.
Topping in Long Beach, California, where he had his '55 drums drilled.
I checked out Topping's web site and learned all about drilling holes in brake drums.
When I called, I talked Vince Bunting, who gave me the whole scoop.
The company was founded in 1931 by C.
Topping to sell auto parts.
Topping later learned the drilling trick from a fellow named Mel Hamer, who came up with ventilatedif he drilled some holes in his brake drums the heat would escape and the car would stop better.
It worked so well, that all the other racers wanted him to do theirs also.
Apparently this became a well-kept secret, as nobody Bigger leaner stronger bonus report mentioned the technique to had ever heard of it.
It was while he was working with Bill Stroppe on various Ford race car projects that a production car engineer told Hamer drilled drums would never work near as well as the new disc brakes they were then developing.
Bunting figures that comment led to the reason Detroit never produced ventilated drums and why the rest of us know nothing about them.
The first question people ask is about water and dust.
If you've driven a drum brake equipped car through water you know braking is non-existent.
With holes in the drums, centrifugal force not only evacuates dust, but water immediately as well.
But the main benefit is the fact that when drums are vented properly, so as to eliminate balance and material integrity problems, they virtually eliminate fade, which is.
He figured drums in the first place.
Gasses are vented as well, as the holes create what amounts to a venturi effect, venting gases created by compression of air between the shoes and drum that would otherwise be trapped in a stock, unvented drum, hindering braking efficiency.
This also holds true with disc brakes believe it or notso venting is beneficial here, too.
Another benefit is reduced unsprung weight, which improves ride quality.
Surprisingly, a brake disc weighs three times what a drum does, and calipers are four times heavier than a wheel cylinder.
Cars designed with discs take all those extra pounds approximately 60 total into consideration in their suspension system.
Therefore, adding discs to the Plymouth would likely roughen up the ride quite a bit if I didn't change the springs and shock absorbers to compensate for the extra pounds.
I can't think of an easier, less expensive way to upgrade read article stock brakes.
All you have to do is box up your drums and send them to C.
They will have them back to you in just a couple of days.
It would be a good idea to have them checked for cracks or excessive wear first.
They also supply a wide variety of master cylinders, including the modern dual chamber model I decided to replace my stock one with.
Oh, they will also ventilate disc brakes, if you are already so equipped.
Give them a call for more info.
Do it yourself 1 Brake drums are bolted together in front and rear pairs, then placed on the rollers of Vince's articulated jig.
Note how the holes fan out on an angle, making the venting process much more efficient.
Nothing could be further from the truth.
Nothing could be further from the truth.
How about "Drilling the drums causes a 1 kiloton nuclear explosion.
Ok i can buy in to the drilled drums and roters, but why not bolt em up on the engine stand and start drilling.
The patterns not that complicated.
BURNTFISH - That's the hotrod shop I was referring to in the original post.
Juzzme - I'm anal enough that I don't want to fawk 'em up myself, and I'd like the holes drilled reasonably evenly, so the balance of the drums isn't thrown too https://promocode-money-slots.website/and-slots/rome-and-egypt-slot-machine-free-online.html off.
I'm actually PM'ing with a machinist on the CJ5 forum about this right now.
Maybe we'll get it worked out.
The fact is: -Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.
He may not be road racing his CJ, but it gives me comfort knowing that some people care about braking performance after they put big tires and lifts on 4x4's.
Cut the man some slack.
Purely for looks - the general population still thinks cross drilled rotors are an upgrade.
Take a look at almost any professional race car and you will not see cross drilled rotors on them Edit - Jake beat me to it and I did not read the whole thread first This has been a fun conversation.
I know why alot of shops find it easy to upsell.
Now off to the next debate talk about Hijacks OP asked an easy enough question, WHERE could he get this done, not IF he should get it done Tired of being tired.
If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them.
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Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
USPS flat rate boxes are only a myth, something that clever salesmen thought up to drilled and slotted brake drums suckers with their cash a little faster.
There is no benefit in using USPS to ship anything anywhere, it is far easier, safer and more efficient to take your own stuff wherever it needs to go, especially when that place is Alabama.
I have mailed many flat rate boxes.
I still think it is a waste of time and money.
Drums and rotors are two different animals.
Never underestimate what old hot rodders say.
Practical experience sometimes flies in the face of conventional wisdom, and even theoretical physics.
If the old timers say drilling your drums works, chances are it does.
Good luck finding someone, Rondog.
My brakes were better when 11 inch drum all the way around than disced and now are once again better.
Good luck rondog had I known about this when I was building my old jeeps I would have given it a whirl.
I have mailed many flat rate boxes.
You can only get one drum in a box.
Although I'd like to give him my business helluva nice guy and a great machinist and 1 ram 3 slot, I gotta find myself the best deal I can.
If I can get 'em done locally for less, I gotta do it.
Gonna take 'em by Denver Machine near Coors Field, anybody familiar with them?
I've worked with and for the owners, they're good people, but the shop is definitely geared towards large scale industrial work.
Not sure if they'll take a small walk-in private job like this, but if they do I'm sure they'll do good work.
Don't know about pricing though.
May as well add my two cents on the drilling idea in general.
I can't see how it would help any.
As said, it's not going to help in cooling, and I can't see there being enough braking energy applied in an old CJ to create enough "off-gassing" to be of benefit, if you even believe it helps that.
Good luck though, and definitely post up your results.
Murray's Toys: 76 FJ40, 00 Toyota MR2, 13 Triumph Tiger 800XC, 07 KTM 450EXC, 05 Suzuki SV1000S, 12 Yeti SB66c, too many skis to list.
I got your Jeep thing.

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Stopping power, quality, fit and warranty are all very important things to consider when choosing the correct Brake Rotors for your vehicle.
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brake rotors- blank, slotted or drilled? - Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair Stack Exchange
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drilled and slotted brake drums

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Well the answer to that is I assumed that the Discs would stop even better and be about the same pedal force to, but that didn't turn out to be true. That and them being given to me was all it took for me to swap. Looking back on it I'd have likely kept the drums and eventually drilled the back drums to.


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I wonder why most high end cars (Ferrari, BMW, Corvette, Audi) come with cross drilled/slotted rotors? The fact is:-Cross drilled holes degas brake pads and decrease rotor heat -reduces fade and make your braking system more efficient.


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drilled and slotted brake drums